Messy Room, Messy Mind

So, a while back I posted about how keeping your digital world organized is essential to maximizing productivity and focus, and I made the comparison of your hard-drive space to your room, I said:

“…a messy abode can be the bane of your studying.”

Now, about three-fourths of the way through the school year, I find that this piece of wisdom may merit a larger, more anecdotal recap.

In the beginning of the year, it was incredibly easy to keep a clean room, having just moved in. This is no longer the case in the seventh month of the school year. Old papers have piled up, packages from Mom are found lying around in the boxes they came in, and clothes are strewn about, forgotten in the constant busywork of the week and the complete surrender to relaxation during the weekend. For me, personally, you can take all of that, and you can add receipts, papers, and boxes to things I’ve purchased that I chose to keep in case I’d need them again.

Protip: I didn’t need any of them. Ever again. I suppose certain receipts could merit saving, but these were not examples of those. They were grocery receipts, and receipts for coffee purchased at the dining center. Also, under my desk I have a box I keep recyclables in, and to my side (and the front of that box) I have a rolling drawer/stand thing I use for my laptop. I tried to pull that stand into the living room last week so I could study, and a giant mountain of recyclables collapsed onto my floor. It was a bit ridiculous.

Suddenly I realized why I felt the need to leave my room to do my work. My room had become the most distracting thing in the history of everything ever. When my room is cluttered and unfocused, my mind is cluttered and unfocused. It inspires laziness and procrastination when you’re constantly reminded of the already existing evidence that you’re okay with laziness and procrastination. I would try to work, and my mind would scatter to the boxes, and the packing peanuts, and the pointless envelopes. Finding my school books was no easy task. On a similar note, how many of us either have ADD/ADHD (congratulations on reading this far!), or simply find it less than fulfilling to focus on your schoolwork?

Jumping for joy (image courtesy of Flickr user Luminous Event Photography)

Maybe not the most relevant image...

Well you all seem to be pretty excited about this…and…married? Is this the wrong room? Anyways, my point is that everyone could probably benefit from some extra focus in our lives, and therefore, we can all probably benefit from dispelling the clutter of last semester.

Martin Boehme is a language nerd, blogger, web developer, and occasional rapper. When he's not insisting Waluigi is the best character in Mario Kart, he runs the language-learning blog, Powlyglot, to help you reach fluency faster. Twitter | Facebook

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